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How To Make Apricot Glaze

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Hi guys ūüôā Glaze is a cross between jam and a sticky sauce. Apricots are the most common fruit used but it can be made from any preserved fruit or Jam.

I have been using this recipe for about 15 years, I used to make it a lot when I was cake decorating, I would use sherry (for fruit cakes) or a warm glaze to brush over the cake when it came out of the oven to help the cake stay moist and I would also brush it on before covering the cake with marzipan, not only help it taste nicer but it also helps the marzipan bond to the cake.
Glaze is often used by bakers and has many lovely uses. A shortcrust pastry shell can be brushed with it before the filling goes in to help seal the pastry and also the finished pie or tart can be glazed, adding a golden, glossy look. Danish pastries are always glazed (my favourite pastry!). If you think an apricot flavour would be nice, you can also glaze any un-iced cake or loaf (whilst hot) again, helping it stay moist and also allowing, say, nuts or coconut that you sprinkle on over the glaze, to stay put. You can even ice over the glaze when it has cooled (as it will set like Jam again). If you happen to have some spare in the fridge you can also warm it and drizzle it over pancakes, pikelets, a piece of cake,  a muffin, a slice of chocolate brownie or on dessert just before serving. Fruitcake bakers use it a lot, brushing it onto a cake just out of the oven, and usually arranging fruit and/or nuts on top and then sealing them on with more glaze, or under the marzipan as I use to. Often liqueur like Brandy or Grand Marnier is added to glaze, especially Christmas cakes. Apricot glaze is also used in savoury cooking. It can be brushed over roast chicken or pork chops whilst they are cooking  (most often other ingredients added like mustard, brown sugar, liqueur and even herbs) and my absolute favourite, glazed ham at Christmas.

Apricot Glaze

 

INGREDIENTS

2/3 cup of apricot jam
1 tablespoon of water (or liqueur, see above)
1 teaspoon of sugar

 

METHOD

Place all the ingredients in a small saucepan and on a medium heat bring to the boil. Once boiling turn the heat down to medium/low and simmer for around 2 minutes (stirring occasionally) and then remove from the heat. If you would like a smooth, clear glaze you can pour it through a sieve.

Makes 3/4 cup (If sieved a little bit less).

Note* It will set to a jam consistency when it cools so you will need to warm it again before use. Storage is the same as Jam, so in or out of the fridge in an airtight, sterile jar.

Apricot Glaze

I have used this glaze on two of my brownies. This one is brushed with it when it comes out of the oven and this one is the same but has crispy toasted walnuts in it.

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6 Comments:

  1. Hi can I use apricot Jam glaze for Pork spare Ribs

  2. I have just taken my Christmas cake out of the oven and as yet it isn’t glazed.Is it imperative that it be glazed whilst still hot( or warm)? And also do I glaze the whole top of the cake or just the fruit -which pretty much is over the whole top surface
    Thanks for help
    ( And happy CHRISTMAS)ūüéĄ

    • Hi Norma ūüôā I use a pastry brush to generously brush warm glaze over the entire surface of the warm cake where the nuts and fruit will be placed and then place the fruit and nuts on immediately so they will stick there. Next, I use a pastry brush to brush the glaze (I sieve it for this, so it’s smooth) carefully all over the tops of the fruit and nuts so they are nice and shiny and that too helps them stay put. I hope this helps! Merry Christmas to you too!

  3. I have glazed. My Christmas cake with apricot glaze over fruit. Please can you give me a remedy to put on as this has made all very sticky

    Thanking you

    Glenys New Zealand

    • Hello Glenys ūüôā Whilst the glaze is still warm I brush the cake with it using a pastry brush to help the fruit and/or nuts stay in place and then I brush it over the top of the fruit and/or nuts. When the glaze cools down it’ll go thick like Jam again so if you made it earlier on and it’s gone cold, reheat it over a low heat until it’s warm and at a nice consistency again. Also whilst hot I would sieve the glaze before brushing it overtop of fruit and nuts. I hope this helps!

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